Samuel Smith Farmstead First-Period Colonial

Herb and Flower Gardens

 

The First Period Colonial Herb and Flower Gardens at the Samuel Smith Farmstead strive to depict a rural farm garden with its typical use of materials-on-hand[1]. The raised dirt beds are utilizing the rocks on the property for borders, and the property’s small stones for the visible drainage trench beneath the roof overhang.

Pathways, where necessary, within and bordering the garden would have been packed soil, boards, bark mulch, crushed sea shells, or tiny pebbles. We have chosen the bark mulch that is on hand for within the garden, and keeping the tiny pebbles that were already on the path to the front door.

Myrtle or Periwinkle (Vinca minor), introduced in the mid-1700s and cultivated as an ornamental, also already on the property, is incorporated in the bank along the street to the garden’s front rock border.

The garden’s flowers and herbs are a selection of those that were in use in the 1600-1700’s (coinciding with the Samuel Smith Farmstead’s existing plant list).  A full list of the plants used is provided.

With an eye to utilization of these gardens for the Samuel Smith Farmstead tours, informational photo pages from the CT Botanical Society website, have provided further information on each plant’s Colonial use, be it culinary, medicinal, and/or insect and odor elimination. These pages, along with existing Samuel Smith Farmstead plant information, make up a mini-interactive presentation for school children.

[1]

O’Sullivan, R. H. (n.d.). Dooryard Garden Colonial Herbs.

Members only click here.

>> Back to Home page

 

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save